Are You Still Acting on Urges to Binge? Tips for Binge Eaters who are Struggling in Recovery, PART 1

*updated June 1, 2019

This post and the next one will be for those of you who are having a difficult time letting the urges pass rather than acting on them. I’ve heard from many women and men who understand the Brain over Binge approach and know they have the ability to avoid binges, but they still find themselves following the urges.

The first thing I want to tell you is that not everyone stops acting on binge urges right away. Even if you have a new understanding of your binge eating based on what you read in my book or another resource, and even if you know you don’t need to solve other problems before you can end the binge eating habit, that doesn’t mean your recovery will be automatic. You are on your own path, and different ideas work for different people in different ways. That’s not to give you excuses, because you are certainly capable of ending this habit for good, but you always want to have self-compassion along the way. Being self-critical is not an effective way to move toward change.

To help you create the change you want, I’m going to list some common obstacles that may be affecting your ability to dismiss binge urges, and I’ll explain how you can move past these obstacles.

[For those of you who are new to the Brain over Binge approach and therefore not familiar with the concept of dismissing urges, and the lower and higher brain (which are discussed in this post), I want to let you know that you can get my free eBook, The Brain over Binge Basics here.]


You are arguing with the binge urges

Several people have asked if there was anything specific I did or told myself to detach from the urges to binge. Besides briefly reminding myself of what I’d learned and the fact that those thoughts weren’t truly me, there wasn’t any specific mental dialogue or action that helped me separate from my lower brain. I simply accepted the experience of the urges, without letting those urges affect me and lead me into a binge.

I think trying to have any sort of mental dialogue with the urges to binge is counterproductive, because it engages the lower brain. The lower brain sends automatic messages to try to get you to maintain a habit it senses you need, and there’s nothing you can say to yourself to make those messages go away. Actually, the more you try to say things to yourself, the more you end up arguing with the urges; and you therefore give the urges more attention and significance, which makes them stronger.

I’m going to use an analogy to try to explain this:

Let’s say you are in an argument with someone, and you are listening, getting upset, and arguing back.  Your words and actions are helping to fuel the disagreement. Whatever you say, the person has a counterargument, and emotions run high. But, if you eventually realize that arguing is futile and not worth your time; you will just quit listening and letting the person’s words affect you. You will still hear what they are saying, and you will still have the experience of being in an argument, but that experience will suddenly feel very different. The person’s words will no longer make any difference to you, and you’ll no longer feel so emotionally charged. That’s detachment. That’s how you can experience the urges to binge.

You don’t need to announce that the urges aren’t worth your time; you don’t need to say “I’m not listening anymore.” Detachment is a mental shift that you can make without any dialogue with the urge thoughts. You can just let the lower brain do what it’s been conditioned to do, without reacting to it, and it will eventually fall silent.

 

You are letting binges lead to more binges

After learning information about the lower/higher brain, completely changing how I understood my bulimia, and realizing that I had the power to stop acting on urges…I still binged two more times. But, I didn’t see the binges as a sign of failure or as an indication that I couldn’t be successful with my new approach to recovery. I saw that I had simply acted on urges to binge, but that it was not inevitable for me to act on binge urges that would follow. After those two binges, I didn’t feel like I had to start over, or find a new approach. I just took a look at what happened, and saw how I could prevent it from happening again.

If you have a binge while you are trying to recover, don’t make it mean more than it does. It doesn’t mean you won’t recover, it doesn’t mean you can’t utilize your higher brain more effectively next time. Something helpful you can do is to mentally go back to determine what led you to act on the urge. I’m not talking about figuring out what events or feelings “triggered” the binge, I’m talking about determining how the urge itself led you into the binge. How did your lower brain get what it wanted? What binge-encouraging thoughts did you believe? When did you lose that detachment and separation from the urges?

You might feel discouraged about a binge, and that’s okay, but by analyzing what happened, you can keep the binge in perspective. You may realize it was just one enticing thought that hooked you and made you decide to follow the urge. You’ll be prepared to experience the next urge without believing the lower brain’s faulty messages.

 

You feel like you want to binge

In Brain over Binge, I talked about how learning to stop acting on binge urges wasn’t truly difficult for me, but it was tricky at first. My lower brain could be deceptive, and by far the most tempting and common reason it gave me to binge was because I simply wanted to. I had thoughts telling me that it didn’t matter what part of my brain generated my urges, because I wanted to binge nonetheless. I had thoughts telling me I should definitely follow my urges because a binge was my true desire. As long as I stayed detached from those thoughts and viewed them as meaningless, they could not affect me.

This topic of wanting to binge comes up a lot in those who are trying to recover, so I’ve addressed this issue in the following two detailed blog posts: Is “Wanting to Binge” Holding You Back in Recovery? and Do You Want to Recover?

It’s so important to be able to dismiss ANY thought or feeling encouraging binge eating as the neurological junk that it is. This includes those messages that tell you binge eating is worth it, or that it is really you that wants to binge. You don’t need to disagree with those thoughts or try to argue them away, because like I talked about earlier, that doesn’t work; but you can remain unaffected by those thoughts and feelings until they pass.

 

You are not eating enough

I know I bring this up a lot, but I believe it’s the most common reason for struggling in recovery. If you are not eating adequately, you are keeping your body and brain in survival mode, and I truly believe urges that arise because of food restriction are harder to dismiss than urges that arise due to habit. Eating less than you need is not compatible with the Brain over Binge approach. If you think this may be a problem for you, these two blog posts will give you some useful information as you give up dieting:  What if Stopping Binge Eating Means Possible Weight Gain, and What are Your Motivations for Dieting? 

 

You need additional guidance

Some people can read a book or learn the basics of a new approach, and then apply it with consistency, without any additional help. But, this is typically not the case. Most people need to have a way to remind themselves of what they’ve learned; most people need some questions answered along the way; most people need additional clarity about how an approach applies to their specific situation; most people need some reinforcement and some help staying focused as they put an end to binge eating.

There are many ways you can get additional guidance, clarity, and reinforcement; but if you resonate with my approach and would like that extra help from me, I want to tell you that I’ve updated my 8-Week Course to serve as a powerful resource that keeps you on track and moving toward freedom from binge eating (especially if you are struggling in recovery).

As a part of this updated course, I’ve recorded detailed answers to 84 questions I’ve been asked over the years, so that you can get the information, ideas, and advice that you need (at a price that I hope is affordable for anyone).

Here is what one course member had to say:

This course is exactly what I needed to hear! I’ve read countless books on the BED-topic (including Brain over Binge) before, without any success. The course is full of deep insights and packed with valuable and practical information. I really appreciate the rational and organized form everything is presented. I’m exceedingly thankful for the course – it has really changed my life! THANK YOU!!!

You can learn more about the 8-Week Course and sign up HERE . Course starts on June 17th, 2019!

 

 

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